plantain soap for hair

Plantain Soap Wonders: Crafting Natural Shampoo Bars

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Have you ever stumbled upon a natural ingredient that just seems to work wonders for your hair? That’s exactly what happened to me with plantain. In this guide, I’m thrilled to share my journey of discovering and utilizing plantain for hair care. It’s more than just a recipe; it’s about embracing nature’s gifts and integrating them into our daily lives.

Join me as I take you through the process of foraging, preparing, and finally making your own plantain soap for hair. Whether you’re a DIY enthusiast, a nature lover, or just someone looking for a healthier alternative to commercial hair products, this guide is for you. Let’s dive into the world of natural hair care together!

plantain weed - spring herbs
Making Plantain soap starts with this magical plant.

Foraging for Plantain

There’s something incredibly fulfilling about foraging your own ingredients. It connects you to nature in a profound way and brings an unmatched freshness to whatever you’re creating. For me, this journey started with the humble plantain leaf, often unnoticed, growing wild and free.

I remember walking through my 7 acre property, eyes peeled for these green treasures. Plantain is easy to identify with its ribbed leaves and tall, slender flower spikes. They thrive in meadows, roadsides, and often in your own backyard. Picking them is a mindful experience, ensuring that you leave enough for regrowth and for the wildlife that also depends on them. Learn more about identifying and foraging for plantain here: Amazing Plantain Weed: Nature’s Wonder Herb 

plantain soap pinterest pin

But why plantain for hair?

This unassuming plant is a powerhouse of nutrients. Rich in vitamins A and C, it’s wonderful for scalp health. It also contains allantoin, known for its soothing properties, making it ideal for irritated scalps and dandruff issues. The silica in plantain can promote hair growth and strength, while its natural astringent properties balance oil production, making it suitable for all hair types.

Infusing these leaves with olive oil amplifies their benefits. Olive oil, a staple in hair care for centuries, is rich in antioxidants and hydrates hair deeply. I forage these leaves, dry them gently, and then let them infuse in olive oil for several weeks. This infusion captures the essence of plantain, ready to be transformed into the magic of shampoo bars.

Step-by-Step Guide to Making Plantain Soap Shampoo Bars

Making your own shampoo bars is not just an act of crafting; it’s a ritual that connects you to the ingredients and the process. Here, I’ll guide you through each step to create your own plantain soap shampoo bars using the plantain you’ve foraged and infused in olive oil.

 EQUIPMENT

  INGREDIENTS

LIQUIDS AND LYE

  • 3.9 oz lye
  • 9 oz cold water 

ESSENTIAL OILS

  • 1/2 –1 oz. essential oil of preference.  I used 1 oz. Tea Tree Oil

When it comes to adding essential oils to your shampoo bar recipe, the amount you use can vary based on personal preference and the strength of the essential oil’s scent. However, a general guideline for soap making is to use about 0.5 to 1 ounce of essential oil per pound of soap. 

Method:

Safety First: The first thing I do when making a batch or cold process soap is assemble all needed equipment and ingredients. Then I put on gloves, goggles, and long sleeves for protection. 

equipment needed for making plantain soap

Measure the Water: The first thing I do when making a new batch of soap is measure the cold water and pour it into a heatproof pitcher. I keep a set of glass measuring cups in various sizes for soap making.  When measuring, be sure to use a kitchen scale.  It is essential to be precise when measuring ingredients for soap.  

shampoo bars

Lye Solution: Next, weigh the lye using a kitchen scale, then carefully add the lye to the water and mix until dissolved. I like to do this part outdoors, as this will initially make fumes.  Be sure to wear your goggles and gloves.  Lye is caustic and will burn if it comes in contact with skin. Allow the lye solution to cool for 30 to 40 minutes until it reaches a temperature of about 100 to 110°F (38 to 43°C). To speed this up, you can place the pitcher in the sink filled with ice water.

Oil Mixture: Next, weigh all the oils accurately. Melt the coconut oil and shea butter in a stainless pot on the stove, then add in the other oils, but not the essential oils – that will come later.  Warm the oil mixture to approximately 100 to 110°F (32 to 38°C).

melting solid oils in a stainless steel pot for making plantain soap

Blending: Once both the lye solution and oils are at the right temperature (both mixtures around 110°), slowly pour the lye solution into the oils.  Mix them by alternating between hand stirring and using a stick (or immersion) blender until the mixture reaches ‘trace’ – when the mixture is thick enough to leave a mark on the surface.  For a batch this small, you can opt to hand mix using a whisk, although it will take a bit longer than using an immersion blender. 

Adding Extras: After the mixture has reached trace (kinda like thick pudding), it’s time to stir in your essential oils. This is entirely optional.  If you’re sensitive to essential oils or smells, you can certainly leave it out.  

shampoo bars

Pouring and Curing: You’re almost finished! Now, simply pour the mixture into your mold. At this point, I like to take the back of a spoon or small rubber spatula and make a few swirly designs on top of my mixture, but this is not necessary.  Then cover (I use a piece of cardboard) and insulate the soap mold (with a blanket or towel) for 24 hours. After this, remove it from the mold and cut it into bars. The bars will need to cure for 4–6 weeks before use.

Remember, the key to great soap is precision and patience. Weigh your ingredients carefully, monitor your temperatures, and give your bars ample time to cure. The result is a wonderfully natural, nourishing shampoo bar that’s kind to your hair and the environment.

plantain soap for hair

Personal Experiences and Benefits

When I first started using plantain soap for my hair, I was a bit skeptical. Could something so simple and natural really make a difference? The answer was a resounding yes! After just a few washes, I noticed a significant change in my hair’s health and appearance.

My Experience:

  • Soothing Scalp: I used to struggle with a dry, itchy scalp, especially in winter. After switching to plantain soap, the irritation eased significantly. The natural soothing properties of plantain really made a difference.
  • Stronger, Shinier Hair: My hair feels stronger and looks shinier. Plantain’s rich nutrient profile seems to nourish each strand from the inside out.
  • Reduced Dandruff: The astringent properties of plantain helped in controlling dandruff. My scalp feels cleaner and healthier.

The beauty of plantain soap lies not just in its effectiveness, but also in its versatility. It’s suitable for various hair types and concerns, making it a wonderful addition to any natural hair care routine.

Remember, everyone’s hair is different, and what works for one might not work for another. But the beauty of DIY and natural products is the joy of experimenting and finding what works best for you.

homemade soap in a big bowl

Tips and Tricks for Best Results

While plantain soap shampoo bars are a wonderful addition to your hair care routine, a few tips and tricks can help you maximize their benefits. Here’s what I’ve learned through my personal experience and feedback from others:

  1. Frequency of Use: Finding the right frequency for using plantain soap is key. For most, 2-3 times a week works well, but listen to your hair and adjust as needed.

  2. Lathering Technique: Rub the bar between your hands to create lather, then apply it to your hair. This technique helps in even application and prevents the bar from getting too soggy.

  3. Rinse Thoroughly: Ensure you rinse your hair thoroughly after each wash to remove any soap residue. This is crucial for maintaining the health and shine of your hair.

  4. Storage: Keep your shampoo bar in a dry place between uses. A soap dish with drainage works best, as it prevents the bar from becoming soft and mushy.

  5. Pairing with Natural Conditioners: For an extra nourishing hair care routine, pair your plantain soap with natural conditioners. Herbal rinses or a small amount of apple cider vinegar diluted in water can work wonders.

  6. Patience is Key: Natural hair care products, like plantain soap, may take time to show results. Be patient and give your hair time to adjust to this new routine.

Remember, the transition to natural hair care products is not just about the end result but also about enjoying the journey and learning what works best for you and your hair.

soap stacked up

Embracing Nature for Healthier Hair

As we conclude this journey into the world of plantain soap for hair care, it’s clear that sometimes the most effective solutions come from the simplest sources. Plantain, a humble backyard herb, when combined with the nourishing properties of olive oil, transforms into a powerful natural remedy for various hair concerns.

This guide aimed not just to share a recipe, but to inspire a deeper connection with the ingredients we use. The process of foraging, infusing, and crafting your own plantain soap shampoo bars is as rewarding as it is beneficial. It’s about taking control of what goes into your hair care products and, in turn, what we put on our bodies.

Whether you’re looking to soothe an irritated scalp, strengthen your hair, or simply shift towards a more natural and sustainable lifestyle, plantain soap is a wonderful starting point. Its versatility and effectiveness make it suitable for all hair types, providing a gentle yet potent alternative to commercial hair care products.

Remember, the transition to natural products is a journey. It requires patience and a willingness to learn and adapt. But the rewards — healthier hair, a healthier environment, and a newfound appreciation for nature’s gifts — are well worth the effort.

plantain soap for hair

Step-by-Step Guide to Making Plantain Soap Shampoo Bars

Barbi Gardiner
Discover the magic of nature with our Plantain Soap Shampoo Bars! Crafted from plantain-infused olive oil, these bars are a natural treat for your hair and scalp.
No ratings yet
Prep Time 30 minutes
Curing Time 30 days
Total Time 30 days 30 minutes
Servings 10 bars

Ingredients
  

  • 9 oz coconut oil
  • 9 oz olive oil infused with plantain herb infused Here’s how to infuse herbs in oils
  • 4 oz shea butter
  • 3 oz castor oil
  • 3 oz sweet almond oil
  • LIQUIDS AND LYE
  • 3.9 oz lye
  • 9 oz water
  • ESSENTIAL OILS
  • 1/2 --1 oz. essential oil of preference.

Instructions
 

  • Put on gloves, goggles, and long sleeves for protection.
  • Measure cold water and pour it into a heatproof pitcher.
  • Next, weigh the lye. Add the lye to the water and mix until dissolved. Allow the lye solution to cool for 30 to 40 minutes until it reaches a temperature of about 100 to 110°F (38 to 43°C). To speed this up, you can place the pitcher in the sink filled with ice water.
  • Weigh all the oils accurately. Melt the coconut oil in a stainless pot on the stove, then add in the other oils. Warm the oil mixture to approximately 100 to 110°F (32 to 38°C).
  • Once both the lye solution and oils are at the right temperature, slowly pour the lye solution into the oils.  Mix them by alternating between hand stirring and using a stick (or immersion) blender until the mixture reaches ‘trace’ - when the mixture is thick enough to leave a mark on the surface.
  • Stir in the essential oils.
  • Pour the mixture into your mold. Cover and insulate (with a blanket or towel) for 24 hours. After this, remove it from the mold and cut it into bars. The bars will need to cure for 4–6 weeks before use.

Notes

BEFORE YOU START: INFUSE YOUR OIL WITH HERBS
Start by mixing a cup of olive oil with a quarter cup of dried plantain. Let it infuse for 2–4 weeks in a cool, dark place. Strain the plantain, and your herb-infused oil is ready for shampoo bar making! 🌿🧼
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

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