12 Easy Herbal Bath Tea Recipes to Elevate Your Bath to Therapeutic Heights

The Outdoor Apothecary is reader-supported. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more

What are the Benefits of Taking a Bath?

Taking a therapeutic bath with bath tea can provide a host of benefits.

It’s no secret that bathing has scientifically proven health benefits with water being long revered for its therapeutic properties.

For centuries, people have realized the beneficial properties of water, like its healing and disease-protecting effects. Due to its importance, water was seen as magic and considered a gift of divinity. Egyptians and Israelites used to plunge themselves in the sacral water of Niles and Jordan, Hindus in the Ganges river for healing their soul and body.

Today, it’s not customary to plunge into rivers, although you certainly could if you wanted. Instead, modern convenience has afforded us the luxury of bathtubs. There’s nothing like a nice long soak in the tub as part of your self-care practice, especially when the day’s stresses get to be too much. As you settle into that warm water, you can feel the demands of the day slip away. 

To elevate your bathing experience even further, try soaking in an herbal bath with therapeutic salts, herbs and essential oils, or what we call bath tea. Using the power of salts, herbs, oils, and soothing warm water, you can absorb supportive plant constituents through the largest organ in your body: your skin.

Making an herbal bath is similar to making tea.  By making a strong herbal tea and adding it to your bathwater, you can get the full benefits of water-soluble plant medicine without leaving your tub a big mess of dried flowers and leaves.

bath tea

What is Bath Tea Good For?

Using herbs in your bath can help to infuse your bathwater with antioxidants and minerals while also reducing inflammation and helping to balance your skin. 

Other Benefits:

  • Detoxifies skin.
  • May delay skin cell aging.
  • Promotes healing of sores and wounds.
  • Soothes Stressed Skin.
  • Help to balance skin tone.
  • Aid in the repair of sun damage.
  • Promotes rejuvenation of skin cells.
  • Fights free radicals.
  •  Reduces inflammation
  • Improves psoriasis
  • Reduces dandruff
  • Helps treat and prevent Acne and aids in the healing of other skin conditions

How Do You Make Bath Tea?

There are a couple of different ways that you can prepare your herbal bath tea. 

Method One: Combine your herbs and simmer them until well steeped – about 15 minutes.  Then strain them through a cheesecloth before adding your infused tea liquid directly to your bath.

Method Two: Add all of your ingredients to an unbleached muslin bag and hang it on your tub nozzle.  Turn your water on hot and let it run over your bag of herbs until your tub is half full.  Then adjust your temperature to fill the tub the rest of the way and toss your bag into the water as you soak. 

Method Three: Put all of your herbs in a coffee filter and prepare as if making a pot of coffee (without the coffee). Pour the liquid directly into your bath.  You can tie up the coffee filter and toss it in the tub as well, or compost to discard. *This is good if you are rushed but note that it does not make as potent of a solution as do the other two methods. 

Common Bath Tea Ingredients

  • Epsom Salts – are full of magnesium that helps to relieve pain and relax muscles.  Simply add two cups to your next soak to reap the benefits.
  • Pink Himalayan Salt – 
  • Rolled oats create a mild foam and its cleansing and moisturizing properties clear and hydrate the skin.
  • Dead Sea salt and soda soften the skin and relieve sore muscles. The high magnesium content in Dead Sea salt also helps the skin to absorb and bind moisture better.
  • Dried chamomile (Matricaria recutita)- flowers reduce inflammation and redness and can promote the healing of minor wounds. Chamomile is also antispasmodic so it helps reduce muscle cramps and muscle tension.
  • Calendula (Calendula officinalis) anti-inflammatory, promotes skin healing
  • Common Chickweed (Stellaria media) relieves inflammation, antiseptic and antifungal properties
  • Comfrey (Symphytum officinale) contains allantoin, which promotes new skin cell growth 
  • Echinacea aka Purple Coneflower  (Echinacea purpurea)  anti-inflammatory, hastens skin repair.
  • Green tea (Camellia sinensis) anti-inflammatory, contains antioxidant flavonoids that offer protection protect the skin from ultraviolet radiation damage and reduce inflammation
  • Lavender (Lavandula) pain-relieving properties, antibacterial, antiseptic, reduces inflammation
  • Plantain (Plantago major)  anti-inflammatory, analgesic, soothing
  • Red Clover (Trifolium pratense) alleviate inflammation, skin rashes and irritations
  • Rose petals (Rosa) antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral
  • Yarrow (Achillea millefolium) antimicrobial, pain-relieving properties
  •  Peppermint (Mentha piperita) Peppermint is the ultimate muscle relaxer. It helps relieve tense and sore muscles.

DIY Bath Tea Recipes

1. Basic Bath Tea

Making an herbal bath tea is easy. All you need are two basic ingredients to start, then you can customize depending on what you like:

  • 1 oz. dried herbs
  • 1 quart boiling water

Directions

  1. Bring the water to a boil and pour it over the dried herbs.
  2. Cover, and let steep for at least 20 minutes.
  3. Strain the liquid through a tea strainer, cheesecloth, or an old, clean shirt.
  4. Add the tea directly to a full, warm bath. For additional relaxation, add 2 cups of Epsom salts directly to the bath.

Check the temperature to make sure it is comfortable, and get on in! Try to soak for at least 20 minutes to receive the full benefits of the bath.

Note: If your bath tea includes roots, you may want to simmer the herbs and water on the stove for 20 minutes rather than just pouring hot water over the herbs and letting them steep.

2. Anti-inflammatory Bath Tea

Ingredients

  • ⅓ oz. dried ginger (Zingiber officinale)
  • ⅓ oz. dried sweet birch bark (Betula lenta)
  • ⅓ oz. dried yarrow (Achillea millefolium)
  • 2 cups Epsom salts
  • 1 quart water

Directions

  1. In a pan on the stovetop, add the ginger and birch bark to the water.
  2. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer for 10 minutes. Add the yarrow and simmer for an additional 10 minutes.
  3. Strain the liquid through a tea strainer, cheesecloth, or an old, clean shirt.
  4. Add the tea directly to a full, warm bath, and add the Epsom salts. Relax in the bath and feel your aches and pains drift away.

3. Soothing Bath Tea

Ingredients

  • 1 quart water
  • ⅓ oz. lavender (Lavandula spp.)
  • ⅓ oz. lemon balm (Melissa officinalis)
  • ⅓ oz. rose (Rosa spp.)

Directions

  1. Bring water to a boil, and pour it over the dried herbs.
  2. Cover, and let steep for at least 20 minutes.
  3. Strain the liquid through a tea strainer, cheesecloth, or an old, clean t-shirt.
  4. Add the tea directly to a full, warm bath. Soak for at least 20 minutes to give yourself ample time to soak in the beneficial constituents of the tea.

4. Dry Skin Bath Tea

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup powdered milk or powdered coconut milk
  • 1/2 cup ground oatmeal
  • 1/2 cup pink Himalayan salt
  • 1/2 cup dried rose petals
  • 15-20 drops of lavender, carrot seed, jasmine, geranium, frankincense, or chamomile essential oils or a combination thereof.  

Directions

  1. Combine the powdered milk or powdered coconut milk in a bowl. Stir well.
  2. Add the essential oils of your choice. Stir well.
  3. Spoon into a jar.
  4. To use as a tea, spoon two to four tablespoons into a tea bag or muslin bag and hang it on your tub nozzle.  Turn your water on hot and let it run over your bag of herbs until your tub is half full.  Then adjust your temperature to fill the tub the rest of the way and toss your bag into the water as you soak. 
  5. After your bath, empty the muslin bag, rinse well, let dry. If you use a tea bag, compost it and the rose milk bath tea mixture.

5. Wildflower Bath Tea

Ingredients

  • 5 tbsp rolled oats
  • 2 tbsp Dead Sea salt
  • 2 tbsp dried chamomile
  • 1 tbsp soda
  • 1 – 2 tbsp dried flower petals (e.g. cornflower, calendula, lavender buds, rose petals)
  • 1-2 Tbsp carrier oil (coconut, sweet almond, or olive oil)

Essential Oils

  • 3 drops lavender essential oil
  • 2 drops geranium essential oil
  • 2 drops lemon balm essential oil

Directions

  1. Mix the dry ingredients. Put the dry ingredients into a mixing bowl and combine.
  2. Add the essential oils. Drip the essential oils on a small spoon and then stir into the dry ingredients until well absorbed.
  3. Pack the bath tea. Fill the bath tea into muslin bags, or small mason jars.
  4. Add Carrier oil directly to bath water to ensure essential oils are bestter absorbed. 
  5. Hang the bag on your tub nozzle.  Turn your water on hot and let it run over your bag of herbs until your tub is half full.  Then adjust your temperature to fill the tub the rest of the way and toss your bag into the water as you soak. 

Tip: The recipe makes enough for 2 muslin bags or 1 4-oz jar. 

6. Thai Bath Tea Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup Sea Salt, Medium
  • 1/16 ounce Jasmine Sambac Attar*
  • 1/4 cup dried Lemongrass
  • 1/4 cup dried Jasmine Flowers
  • 1/4 cup dried Spearmint
  • 1/8 cup Kelp Powder
  • 1/8 cup Green Tea Powder

Directions

  1. Combine the Sea Salt and Jasmine Motia Attar in a mixing bowl. Stir to combine, making sure that all of the Attar has absorbed into the salt.
  2. Add the dried herbs, flowers, tea, and sea vegetables to the salt mixture and stir well.
  3. Spoon 2-4 Tbsp of the mixture into your tea bag.
  4. Hang the bag on your tub nozzle. Turn your water on hot and let it run over your bag of herbs until your tub is half full.  Then adjust your temperature to fill the tub the rest of the way and toss your bag into the water as you soak. 

7. Green Tea Bath

A green tea bath replenishes and restores balance to your skin. Green tea also has natural antioxidants, which help in detoxing your body from toxins.

Ingredients and Directions

  1. Place 6 -10 green tea bags in a small pot on the stove.  Heat to boiling, then turn off and allow tea to steep for 15-20 minutes. 
  2. Start the tub and fill with warm water.
  3. Gently pour your tea mixture and tea bags into your bath water. 
  4. Hop into your bath and reap its healing benefits.

8. Skin Soothing Tea Blend

Ingredients

  • 1 Tbsp dried Calendula petals
  • 1 Tbsp dried lavender flowers 
  • 1 Tbsp dried Plantain leaves
  • 1 Tbsp dried Chamomile flowers

Directions

  1. Add all ingredients to a tea bad or muslin bag.
  2. Hang your bag from the tub’s nozzle. Turn your water on hot and let it run over your bag of herbs until your tub is half full.  Then adjust your temperature to fill the tub the rest of the way and toss your bag into the water as you soak. 

9. Sleepy Time Bath Tea

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon dried lavender flowers
  • 1 tablespoon dried chamomile flowers
  • 1 tablespoon dried Calendula petals

Directions

  1. Put three tablespoons of dried herbs into a tea bag, or  cotton muslin pouch
  2. Hang your bag from the tub’s nozzle. Turn your water on hot and let it run over your bag of herbs until your tub is half full.  Then adjust your temperature to fill the tub the rest of the way and toss your bag into the water as you soak. 

10. Rose Scented Bath Tea

This rose-scented bath tea is easy to make and the scent is not only soft but relaxing. 

Ingredients

  • 1-1/2 cups epsom salt
  • 1/2 cup Pink Himalayan Sea Salt 
  • 1/4 cup baking soda
  • Rose Oil
  • 1/2 cup dried rose petals

Directions

  1. Combine Epsom salt, pink Himalayan sea salt, and baking soda in a bowl.  Mix thoroughly.
  2. Add 10-12 drops of rose oil and mix again, add dried rose petals.
  3. Scoop into muslin bags, will make approximately six bath tea bags.
  4. Hang your bag from the tub’s nozzle. Turn your water on hot and let it run over your bag of herbs until your tub is half full.  Then adjust your temperature to fill the tub the rest of the way and toss your bag into the water as you soak. 
  5. Soak in the tub for 20-30 minutes.  Enjoy!

11. Lavender Oatmeal Bath Tea

 Ingredients

  • 2 cups Epsom salts
  • 2 heaping tablespoons dried lavender
  • 15-20 drops lavender essential oil
  • 1 cup oatmeal
  • 1 cup powdered milk

Directions

  1. Mix the Epsom salts, dried lavender, and essential oils in a large bowl then add in the powdered milk. 
  2. Ground the oatmeal in a food processor or blender to get a coarse power before adding it to the bowl as well. Mix well and you are ready to fill your tea bags.
  3. Use the spoon to scoop the bath mix into your teabags. Use 2-3 heaping tablespoons of bath mix per bag. This will make around 9 tea bags depending on how much or little you fill them up.
  4. Hang your bag from the tub’s nozzle. Turn your water on hot and let it run over your bag of herbs until your tub is half full.  Then adjust your temperature to fill the tub the rest of the way and toss your bag into the water to infuse.

12. Safe for Babies Tea Blend

Ingredients

  • Lavender
  • Chamomile
  • Calendula
  • Rose Buds
  • Oats
  • Muslin Bag

About the Herbs in The Babies Blend

  • Lavender is a highly aromatic herb used to ease stress and tension. The scent is calming and excellent for babies because it is gentle on sensitive skin.  Adding it to your baby’s bath aides in a good night’s sleep.
  • Chamomile is commonly used as a natural sleep aid. These beautiful, fragrant flowers are great for stress relief, and they also have anti-inflammatory properties. It’s safe for babies (of course).
  • Calendula is another gentle flower that is known for healing skin irritations and inflammation. It’s anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, and anti-septic, and it’s perfect for treating a variety of skin conditions and is also gentle enough for babies.
  • Rose Buds: Besides their light, calming aroma, rose buds are gentle on baby skin. 
  • Oats: not really an herb, but they’re sooting and wonderful for baby’s skin. 

Directions

  1.  Add Ingredients To Muslin Bag.
  2. Be sure to leave some extra space at the top! The oatmeal will swell once submerged in the hot water.
  3. Hang your bag from the tub’s nozzle. Turn your water on hot and let it run over your bag of herbs until your tub is half full.  Then adjust your temperature to fill the tub the rest of the way and toss your bag into the water to infuse.
  4. Let the herbal goodness soak into the tub water for at least 10 minutes. The longer you allow it to infuse, the better! Since babies bathe in cooler water compared to adults, by the time the water is cooled off enough for your baby to bathe in, it should be good and infused.

Tip: Any of these recipes can be doubled, tripled and/or quardrupled and make wonderful gifts, especially when packaged creatively.

Make Your Own Tea Bags

Here are the steps on how to put together your bath tea bag:

Step 1: If you’re using cheese cloth, start by cutting it into a square. (Any size is fine but I usually cut mine at least 12″ x 12″ so I have some extra cloth leftover at the top to tie a knot.)

Step 2:  Lay out the cloth and place your herbs in the center.  I typically stick to an almost equal ratio of all three herbs (with just a little less peppermint, and a little more calendula).

Step 3: Cup the herbs in the center and tie a knot in the cloth. (Or use a string if you prefer).

Step 4:  When you’re ready to use your bath tea bag, simply hang it over the faucet and let the hot water run through to infuse your bath water!

After you’ve filled up your bath, don’t forget to hang up your bath tea bag and let it dry.  You can reuse it up to 3 more times!

Alternative: You could also use an old tshirt or other cotton fabric if you don’t have sheese cloth.

Share on facebook
Share
Share on twitter
Tweet
Share on pinterest
Pin It
Share on pocket
Pocket
Share on email
Follow

More to Explore

permaculture gardening
Barbi Gardiner

Permaculture Gardening: Work With Nature for Amazing Results

Growing your own vegetables, fruits, and herbs utilizing the principles of permaculture gardening is a great way to live closer to nature.

If you are a gardener looking to live more sustainably, then permaculture will be for you. Simply put, it is a way to live sustainably by working with nature to grow your own food.

Continue Reading

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *